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Parkinson's Dance "We departed feeling there was not only hope and support for the future but also fellowship and fun to help manage the condition."

Dance for Parkinson's

Overview

Parkinson’s is a progressive neurological condition that affects approximately one in every 500 people in the UK. 

While the symptoms of Parkinson’s are varied and diverse there are some common symptoms, including difficulties with balance, co-ordination, turning around, posture and walking.

Parkinson’s Dance

Parkinson’s Dance addresses these symptoms in a fun, stimulating, motivating and challenging but safe environment. It is currently developing in the UK with a small number of classes available across the country, one of which is run at Pavilion Dance. 

The PDSW model of Parkinson’s Dance is especially effective as the class is taught by two teachers, one of them a physiotherapist, who ensures that the participants leave every week with a noticeable improvement in balance, coordination and suppleness.

PDSW are proud to be a part of the Dance for Parkinson’s Network UK, which is supported by a number of individuals and national bodies and shares close relationships with organisations such as Parkinson’s UK. We are delighted to have an on-going relationship with the Mark Morris Dance Group Dance for PD and honoured to have delivered collaborative training at the People Dancing Summer School 2015.

 

Parkinson's Dance across the South West of England

In 2017 we continue to roll our model out across the South West region, to enable as many people as possible affected by the condition to access its benefits. Over a period of three years, we are aiming to open six new, regular classes with the first classes starting in Sherborne and Dorchester.

SHERBORNE CLASS: Meet Tuesdays, 2.30pm-4pm. Venue: Digby Hall, Hound Street, Sherborne DT9 3AA.

For more information go to: www.sherborneartslink.org.uk / takepart@sherborneartslink.org.uk / 01935 815899 

DORCHESTER CLASS: Meet Tuesdays, 3pm-4.30pm.  Venue: Dorchester Arts The Corn Exchange, High East Street, Dorchester DT1 1HF.

For more information: www.dorchesterarts.org.uk / enquiries@dorchesterarts.org.uk / 01305 266296

We are grateful to the Health & Wellbeing Legacy Fund for generously supporting the first year of this project.
The aim of the legacy fund is to create a legacy and inspire communities by investing in projects that focus on the particularly vulnerable, marginalised and deprived communities in order to address health inequalities which exist in Dorset.

Our profound thank you also goes to Healthwatch Dorset, Parkinson's UKSherborne ArtsLink, Dorchester Arts, all participants and supporters of Business Come Dancing 2015 and the supporters of or crowdfunding campaign for making this first year possible.

       

     

Raising Awareness

Each April PDSW hosts a free World Parkinson’s Day event, which features information and advice stalls, taster workshops in voice, song and movement and a discussion panel with local artists and health & wellbeing organisations, including representatives from health professionals such as research nurses at the local hospital, Health Watch and Parkinson's UK.

Participants of our Parkinson’s Dance class have been part of Parkinson Dances, a film by Ceri Higgins, an uplifting, poetic and emotional evocation of how the magic of dance helps people face the daily challenges of Parkinson's and live life to the full. Watch the full-length film below (approx. 30 mins).

In 2014 one of our Parkinson's Dance class participants, the amazing Dennis Ross, took part in the Cape Argus Cycle Tour in South Africa to raise funds for the class. Read the story of his Cape Adventure below.

We departed feeling there was not only hope and support for the future but also fellowship and fun to help manage the condition. – Parkinson's Dance class participant

videos & images

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