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Neon Dance in Residency

We support artists and companies who share our aspirations for creating work that connects with people. Part of this support includes offering studio space to professional dance companies, here at Pavilion Dance South West, to develop new work.  Whilst here artists also benefit from the support of our team, including time with our technical staff and producers.

We are going to start inviting our resident artists to guest blog right here, we think it’s really interesting to be able to peer through the studio doors and get an insight in the creative process. So here is the first of many interesting insights into our residency programme:  Neon Dance start us off, they’re here for one week….Enjoy!

Neon Dance & AVA Dance Company will be holding an informal sharing of their progress on Friday 17th at 4pm at Pavilion Dance. If you’re interested in attending please contact danielle@pdsw.org.uk

Day 1

Empathy Research Here’s a mini snippet of an idea we have been playing with today in the studio. The dancer in the video is David Lloyd. The movement came out of a discussion around our entangled relationship with things…

“In the ‘Technical Manifesto’ of Futurist painters published in 1910, Marinetti and other stated that ‘all things move, all things run, all things are rapidly changing’. Even what we call inanimate things have charges, weights. They are attracted to each other or repulse each other.”

Excerpt from the chapter ‘Things are Not Inert’ in Entangled – An Archaeology of the Relationship between Humans and Things by Ian Hodder (2012)

This week is all about testing lots of different ideas and focusing on movement language. Dancers Julia Robert and Rudi Cole have just arrived so off to meet them. Tomorrow = ‘Entangled Tango’ among other ‘things’.

Blog post by Adrienne Hart (Neon Dance)

Watch video below.

 

Day 2

Today we continued with the entangled theme, playing with collective motion…

External influences on behaviour are caused by interactions with others. In 1945 the psychologist Karen Horney identified three ways in which people interact: ‘moving towards people, ‘moving away from people’ and ‘moving against people’. Motion here to be understand largely as a metaphor, but it could also be interpreted literally. People walking with friends, partners or a member of a group aim to stick together; famous people at cocktail parties attract a coterie of admirers and sycophants through their own personal (or manufactured) magnetism. But in most crowds people do not know one another, and so have no propensity to stick together. Rather they try to keep their distance from strangers. Such interactions resemble forces of attraction and repulsion.” Taken from the chapter ‘The March of Reason – Chance and necessity in collective motion’ in Critical Mass – how one thing leads to another by Philip Ball.

Watch video below.

 

Day 3

We should recognize the norm for what it is: a camouflage for all bodies.” – Leopold Lambert
Today, Julia and Rudi morphed into a multi-limbed dancer. I liked how the hybrid form that emerged challenged the idea of a ‘normized body’. I still want to continue playing with this idea so no footage just yet! 
Here’s another idea from today, a sort of ‘locked-in’ duet…
Watch video below.

 


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